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The Geopolitical Ramifications of Syria’s Readmission to Arab League



The Arab League has readmitted Syria, cementing a regional effort to normalise ties with President Bashar al-Assad’s government in a move opposed by Washington.


The decision states that Syria can resume its participation in Arab League meetings and calls for an end to the crises brought on by the country's civil conflict, including the exodus of refugees to nearby nations and drug trafficking throughout the region.


The decision to re-accept Syria into the regional organisation may open the door for China and other nations to assist in reconstructing the nation. Given that Arab states prefer entente to confrontation, the decision may have a big impact on the Syrian government’s ability to rebuild its standing in the region.


Assad owes a lot of his survival to Iran and Russia, who have always been more dedicated to seeing him survive than his rivals in the West and the Middle East were to seeing him overthrown by rebels. The most powerful nations in the Middle East, including Iran, which supports Assad, and Saudi Arabia, Assad's opponent, have now changed the geopolitical landscape of the area in Syria’s favour.


It is a dramatic change in Arab states' stances, which had previously sided with the rebels fighting to topple the Syrian government. Syria's foreign strategy has therefore always revolved around waiting for everyone else to agree with them. It is well known that Assad has survived several foreign leaders who once thought his downfall was inevitable.


Syria is still a damaged country despite this, and sanctions are difficult to lift. As a result, while Syria's readmission to the Arab League may not completely transform the situation, it does help to lessen the government’s isolation. Arab nations want Syria's isolation to end in exchange for action, particularly to stop the flow of the extremely profitable and addictive amphetamine captagon across Syria's borders into the Persian Gulf.


Given the country's rising interest in the Middle East, China might also assist in rebuilding Syria. China has previously made infrastructure investments in Syria, and the Belt and Road Initiative seeks to connect Asia with Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. The project might offer China a framework for financing Syria's post-conflict restoration efforts.


The Arab League's decision to re-accept Syria into the regional organisation may open the door for China and other nations to assist in reconstructing the nation. The action is a step in the right direction towards regional peace and rehabilitation, which may eventually result in more stability in the Middle East.

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